Tulsi

CREATIVE EXPRESSION TO DEPICT, ACKNOWLEDGE AND HEAL DIVISIVE CONFLICTS THAT HAVE INTERNAL AS WELL AS EXTERNAL – WITH SOCIETY, SOCIAL MORES AND CONDITIONING – ASPECTS, TO CREATE ART AND CREATIVE PRODUCTS THAT LIBERATE THE SELF
September 2017, Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology

Fairytales form a huge part in one’s childhood. It encourages one’s imagination and creative thinking. However fairytales are far from the reality of today. They don’t do justice to the modern day ideologies of equality. Most fairytales have a similar plot where women undergoes a lot of hardships, emotionally or physically until a prince charming appears for a happily-everafter.

Ideas of beauty, perfection, how a women and man should be, love at first sight, a prince charming and a happily-ever-after life all seemed to have formulated from the fairytales in history. So does the idea of patriarchy. These ideas sets in the minds of the young children who grows up reading and watching these fairytales and other children’s books, movies and cartoon.

I was motivated to take the story of Rapunzel to deconstruct and discern as it made a lot of parallels with my own life and what I’ve seen around me. Children are often bearers of the repercussions from the wishes and promises that the parents make in their name, just as seen in the story of Rapunzel. Child marriage in India is a widely evident example of this.

I intended to subvert the pedagogies as seen in the story of Rapunzel and visually narrate a speculative and alternative story of Rapunzel as it could have happened if certain roles and situations were inverted. I wish to make it relevant for the modern day kid by narrating a modern social issue/realities. What one sees or hears in one’s childhood stays forever. Hence it’s important to tell children stories that are also meaningful and pragmatic rather than only unrealistic and fanciful.